INDONESIA – Permanent People’s Tribunal on Living Wages 20140620-24

00:20:20 local time map of indonesia INDONESIA

* Indonesian garment industry receives human rights trial:

Tomorrow marks the start of the fourth People’s Tribunal, a human rights trial held by garment workers’ unions and human rights groups to hear evidence of systematic human rights abuses in the Indonesian garment industry.

The People’s Tribunal in Indonesia is the fourth of its kind to be held in Asia, the former being held in Sri Lanka, Cambodia and India.

Supplier factory owners, government and industry representatives, multinational brands and over 140 factory workers will give evidence in front of a panel of judges from several continents on the topic poverty pay and poor working conditions.

Wages below poverty levels are a ongoing problem in the Indonesian garment industry, with an average monthly minimum wage for garment workers of around €82, which is only 31% of a living wage enough to support a family.

Evidence has been gathered which demonstrates issues such as illegal compulsory overtime, inhuman productivity measures, wage theft, systematic denial of social security payments, sexual harassment and gender discrimination, and active suppression of the right to freedom of association.

“A living wage is the cornerstone of decent working conditions,” says Emelia Yanti from the Asia Floor Wage Alliance. “Paying a living wage has a positive effect on the reduction of overtime and malnutrition. It means workers have the choice to refuse work due to unsafe working conditions and it means they can take time off for ill health.”

International workers’ rights group the Clean Clothes Campaign will also participate in the tribunal and will urge governments and global buyers sourcing from Indonesia to take the findings seriously.

“With this tribunal we hope to see some real commitment from big brands buying from Indonesia to start addressing the real needs of their workers – a living wage should be at the root of these policies,” said Mirjam van Heugten, Clean Clothes Campaign International Secretariat.
“A living wage is a human right. You simply cannot claim to be a sustainable company as long as wages fail to meet the basic needs of workers and their families.”

To follow the tribunal as it happens:
Tumbler: http://asiafloorwage.tumblr.com/
Facebook: facebook.com/asiafloorwage
to read.
CCC

20140620 AFWind

* PERMANENT PEOPLE’S TRIBUNAL ON LIVING WAGES:

Giving workers a voice

As part of the Asia Floor Wage Alliance Worker Tribunals have been taking place across the region given workers an opportunity to share their expereinces and speak with government and brand represenatives around the issues they face due to poverty pay in the garment sector.

The tribunals have been held in conjunction with the Permanent People’s Tribunal and have gathered testimony from workers, trade unions and experts.

Tribunals have taken place in Sri Lanka, India and Cambodia,
and between June 21- 24 2014 the next tribunal will take place in Indonesia.
read more.
CCC

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Follow on Twitter: @AFWIndonesia

(this page will be updated during the Tribunal)

 20140620

PROGRAM​

INDONESIA PEOPLE’S TRIBUNAL ON MIMIMUN LIVING WAGE AND DECENT WORKING CONDITIONS

for Garment Workers as a Fundamental Right

21-24 June 2014, Jakarta

 

 

Day One: Indonesia Tribunal Hearing Saturday, 21 June 2014

8:00-9:00 Arrival of participants and registration

9.00-9:15 Opening Ceremony/welcome  Introduction and Objective by host

9.15-9.45
Welcome from Indonesia trade union (FSBI, GSBI, SPN, SBSI 92, KSBSI ,Garteks)

9.45-10.00
Introduction of the judges- Description of Process

10.00-10.15
Introduction of the Petition

10.15-10.35
Tea break

10.35-10.55 Wokers Case 1  On gender discrimination

10.55-11.15 Workers Case 2  On insufficient wages and impact on workers

11.15-11.35 Workers Case 3  On long working hours

11.35-11.55 Workers Case 4  On the problems of contract employment

11.55-12.15 Workers Case 5 On the violations regarding freedom of association and collective bargaining

12:15- 13.00 Lunch

13.00-13.30 Summing up

13.30-14:05 Expert 1: Indonesia political economic overview and garment industry related to labour wages

14:05-14:40 Expert 2: Policy on garment industry

14.40-15.15 Expert 3: Indonesia Labour law pertaining to Garment Industry

16.15-16.50 Expert 5: Practice of Contract Labour system in garment industry

16.50-17.25 Summing up

Day Two 22 June 2014

8.00-9.00 Registration of participants

9.00-9.35 Expert 6: Brands and Living Wage

9.35-10.10 Expert 7: Jobs with Justice’s view on view on Walmart purchasing practices and the brand’s possibility of supporting Living Wage

10:10-10.35 Tea break

10.35-11.10 Expert 8:Global Supply Chains in garment industry and example in Indonesia

11.10-11.45 Expert 9: H&M purchasing practices and the brand’s possibility of supporting Living Wage

11.45- 12.20 Expert 10: ADIDAS purchasing practices and the brand’s possibility of supporting Living Wage

12.20-13.20 Lunch

13.20-13.55 Expert 11: AFW is doable

13.55-14.30 Stakeholder : Brand 1

14.30-15.05 Stakeholder: Brand 2

15.05-15.40 Additional comment by Brands

15.40-16.15 Summing by People’s Advocate

Day Three 23 June 2014 : Judges’ Deliberations

Day Four  24 June 2014

9:00-9.30 Registration of participants

9:30-11.30 Press Conference :Announcement of Observations and Recommendations by the Tribunal Panel of Judges

11.30-13.00 Lunch

Notes:
Judges:
Dr. Gianni Tognoni
Professor Gill H. Boehringer
Haris Azhar (Kontras)
Lita Anggraini

People Advocates :
Ashim Roy
Alghifari Aqsa
Asfinawati

Brands invited:
H&M, Adidas, Nike, Gap and Walmart

ASFWa

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20140624

* Indonesian wage trial: human rights violations ‘systemic’:

After a two-day public hearing, the jury of the People’s Tribunal to assess human rights abuses faced by workers in the Indonesian garment industry, announced its verdict today.

Judges found overwhelming evidence of ‘systematic violation of the fundamental right to a life lived with human dignity’ in an industry employing mostly women and said ‘urgent action must be taken’ by a variety of stakeholders.

The jury stressed the fact that a living wage and freedom of association are imperative to sustain a global garment industry which respects human rights of garment workers.
They acknowledged that ‘in recent years some progress has been made in tackling the challenges faced by workers in an industry dominated by a small number of buyers’, however they expressed grave concerns for ‘the lack of urgency and transparency’ among the brands.

Mirjam van Heugten from Clean Clothes Campaign says: “A living wage is the cornerstone of decent working conditions. If garment workers are still living in poverty, which we know they are, no brand can claim that they are truly a sustainable company. The fact that brands have become ‘manufacturers without factories’, does not mean they can shirk responsibility for the human right violations of the women who stitch their clothes.”

The judges described in detail the immediate actions to be taken by global brands and pointed to the fact that a living wage is an enabling human right that must be an inherent part of any sustainable corporate accountability framework.
They also expressed great concern for the existing legislation making suspension of the minimum wage a relatively easy process in Indonesia, and ‘one that is not uncommon’.
read more.
CCC20140624 AWIWorkers protes to adidas representatif on Indonesia Peoples Tribunal
to see.
ASFWa

indonesiaTRIBUNAL

20140622

* Day 2 of the People’s Tribunal on living wages:

Expert #1 Doug Miller, emeritus professor in labour right in fashion.

The first presentation is from emeritus professor in labour right in fashion at the Design School at the Northcumbria University in the United Kingdom.

Between 2000 and 2008 he was director of research at the International Textile Garment and Leather Workers Federation, now part of global union IndustriALL, where he worked on frameworks on wages.

Doug Miller speaks about how brands externalise the problem of wages by shifting the focus away from the buyer-driven nature of the economics of buyer-supplier relationships. In other words: they shrink responsibility by outsourcing their production.

—–

20140622 ASWI
Erica Smiley, Campaigns Director for Jobs with Justice, talks about the continuous lack of respect of US garment giants GAP and Walmart for the workers stitching the clothing they sell in the US.

“Walmart is the largest company in the world because their business model necessitates a race to the bottom. It’s not an accident which follows from government-set low wages; it’s an intentional strategy which means it’s inevitable they have to squeeze their suppliers.”

— Erica Smiley, Campaigns Director of Jobs with Justice.

——-

“Walmart is the largest company in the world because their business model necessitates a race to the bottom. It’s not an accident which follows from government-set low wages; it’s an intentional strategy which means it’s inevitable they have to squeeze their suppliers.”

— Erica Smiley, Campaigns Director of Jobs with Justice.

——

“Under the UN Guiding Principles, companies have the obligation to assess, report on and remedy any violations of human rights that occur in any part of their supply chain.
This means that even if they are not directly involved with a company which stitches their clothing, they are still responsible for the conditions on that work floor.Since earning a living wage is a human right, this also is the case for paying a wage that meets the basic needs of workers.”

— Expert Jeroen Merk shows how the UN Guiding Principles Framework relates to the issue of living wages.

20140622 AFWI 4

——-

20140622 AFWI 2
Expert #4 Malin Kjellqvist

from the Fair Trade Center in Sweden wonders how H&M can live up to their promises of paying a fair wage when there’s no mention of any amount in their roadmap.

—–

“No, we have never done that.”

20140622 AFWI 3
Payal Jain from H&M
responds to questions about wages, freedom of association and other working conditions.

“No, we have never done that.”

— After explaining H&M’s roadmap to a fair living wage, Payal Jain, social sutainable responsible” from H&M admits H&M never attempted to calculate a concrete amount for a living wage since 1997.

—–

20140622 AFWI 5
The placards say ‘adidas don’t lie’

The adidas representative sparks a spontaneous protest from the audience when she says ‘no factory is perfect’ after being asked to responds to yesterday’s allegations on wage theft and violence from garment worker Kokom.
——-

“H&M, adidas and other global brands have projects here, and projects there. But the fact is that they are part of a global brand community, which comes with a responsibility.
They are talking about all kind of things, but what they should be talking about are human rights. And that they are not doing.
They should be reforming the global supply chain. And that they are not doing. And we should hold them accountable for that.”

— Expert Ashim Roy from the New Trade Union Initiative in India submits his arguments to the jury.

read & see more.
ASFWa

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20140621

“The majority of workers employed in the Indonesian garment industry is female. It is these women who create profit for the supplier companies and brand owners.”
— Emelia Yanti from the Asia Floor Wage Alliance and Secretary of GSBI.

* First workers case #H&M:

Oji Sakhroji  from the SBSI ‘92 testifies on cases of gender based discrimination in PT Rismar Daewoo Apparel, a factory where H&M is a buyer.
Supplier of H&M dismisses pregnant workers, according to a very emotional garment worker Oji Sakhroji during the Tribunal.

Article 5 of an employment contract at PT Riswan Daewoo Apparel:
“Especially for female workers, during the first year of employment contract are not allowed to get pregnant. When a female workers is pregnant, then she would be asked to resign, and the third party is not obliged to pay any compensation.” H&M is a buyer from this factory.

* Second worker’s case: wage theft #Nike:

“In 2013, 949 companies in Indonesia were recorded to have proposed suspension of the minimum wage to the governor, and no less than 669 companies received permission to for this suspension,” says Emelia Yanti from the Asia Floor Wage Alliance.

20140621 ASWI

Garment worker and union chair Kokom Komalawati recalls how, at PT Panarub Dwi Karya (adidas supplier), due to the high targets workers who tried to pray, take some water or go to the toilet, would see their workload increased after returning.

—–

20140621 CCC
Workers from the factory where adidas was a buyer show placards saying: “In every pair of adidas shoes there is unpaid workers right.” The protest comes as garment worker and union chair Kokom Komalawati states how adidas’ supplier failed to pay back wages and violently broke a strike.

“The purpose of the Asia Floor Wage is to create a wage that fulfills the basic needs of garment workers in Asia.”
— Surya Tjandra (labour activist and academic) involved in the Trade Union Rights Centre (TURC).
What should a living wage cover?
The right to a living wage: A living wage should be earned  in a standard working week (no more than 48 hours) and allow a garment worker to be able to buy food for herself and her family, pay the rent, pay for healthcare, clothing, transportation and education and have a small amount of savings for when something unexpected happens.
—–
20140621 aswi
When the participants are asked who thinks the labour laws are partial, almost a 100% of the hands go up in the air and a roar goes through the audience.
——
“When workers at a Nike supplier complained about their working conditions, and the factory owner refused to give remedy, they had nowhere to turn to.”
— Expert and leader from the Indonesian trade union SPN Joko Heriyono points to the problematic gap in the legal system.
Workers who see the Nike tags going through their hands don’t have access to the legal system if Nike does not have a formal relationship with the factory.
read & see more.
ASFWa

* Indonesian garment industry faces human rights trial:

June 21st, 2014, marks the start of the fourth People’s Tribunal, a human rights trial held by garment workers’ unions and human rights groups to hear evidence of systematic human rights abuses in the Indonesian garment industry.

The People’s Tribunal in Indonesia is the fourth of its kind to be held in Asia, the former being held in Sri Lanka, Cambodia and India.

Supplier factory owners, government and industry representatives, multinational brands and over 140 factory workers will give evidence in front of a panel of judges from several continents on the topic poverty pay and poor working conditions.
Wages below poverty levels are a ongoing problem in the Indonesian garment industry, with an average monthly minimum wage for garment workers of around €82, which is only 31% of a living wage enough to support a family.

Evidence has been gathered which demonstrates issues such as illegal compulsory overtime, inhuman productivity measures, wage theft, systematic denial of social security payments, sexual harassment and gender discrimination, and active suppression of the right to freedom of association.
read more.
Fibre2fashion

indonesiaTRIBUNAL

________________
To be continued.

 

 

map of Asia

INDONESIA

Permanent People’s Tribunal on Living Wages 20140620-24

* Indonesian garment industry receives human rights trial
* Permanent People’s Tribunal on Wages in Indonesia
* PROGRAM​

20140624
* Indonesian wage trial: human rights violations ‘systemic’

20140622
* Day 2 of the People’s Tribunal on living wages

20140621
* First workers case #H&M
* Second worker’s case: wage theft #Nike
* Indonesian garment industry faces human rights trial

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The men who really run this land
And I wonder why they run it
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What are their names
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I'd like to ride right over
This afternoon and give
Them a piece of my mind
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